Moisturizing Hand Wash

You can make this recipe without the almond oil and glycerin, but the addition of these ingredients makes this hand cleanser silky and moisturizing. It works great if the bottle has a foaming pump – reuse an old one if possible; a regular soap or lotion bottle will work, too, but won’t dispense much foam.

Try these essential oil combinations in your hand cleanser, each of them featuring bright citrus to help deal with kitchen prep odours such as onions and garlic:

Sunny Citrus:  6 lavender • 6 sweet orange • 12 lemon (I made a bottle for myself and one for my mom, who loved it!)

Lemons ’n Roses:  8 lemon • 8 rose geranium • 8 grapefruit

Citrus Mint:  6 tangerine • 6 grapefruit • 6 lime • 6 spearmint

How To:

  • 16 oz. (500 mL) bottle with pump dispenser
  • ¼ cup unscented liquid castile soap
  • 1 tbsp sweet almond oil (or fractionated coconut/apricot kernel/jojoba oil)
  • 1 tbsp vegetable glycerin
  • up to 25 drops essential oils
  • 1 ¼ cups distilled water

Mix castile soap, almond oil and glycerin together and pour in bottle. Add your choice of essential oils. Add distilled water, making sure to leave room for the pump and to allow the mixture to foam up when shaken. Shake well before each use.

6-drop Diffuser Blends for Spring

Fresh and floral, clean and fruity, relaxing or invigorating – try these essential oil recipes in your diffuser to clarify and refresh the air in your home.

These are blends I’ve formulated and tested in my ceramic tealight diffuser, which holds about 2 tablespoons of tap water. If you own a different type, please follow the manufacturer’s instructions.

To Use: Add water to the bowl of your diffuser and drop in the essential oils. (Adjust amounts as desired.) Light the candle and enjoy! Caution: Never leave open flame unattended, and check the water level frequently.Sunrise:  2 lemon • 2 sweet orange • 2 peppermint

En Plein Air:  1 lavender • 2 cedarwood • 3 tangerine

 Raindrops:  1 vetiver • 2 peppermint • 3 lemon

Spring Cleaning:  1 rose geranium • 2 lime • 3 pink grapefruit

Herb Garden:  1 lavender • 1 rose geranium • 2 chamomile • 2 bergamot

Fresh Citrus:  1 lemon • 1 tangerine • 2 pink grapefruit • 2 lime

Springtime in Paris:  2 rose • 2 sweet orange • 2 sandalwood

Gillyflower:  3 clove • 3 lemon

Orange Grove:  2 sweet orange • 2 lime • 2 frankincense

And my absolute favourite:

Like a May Morning:  1 jasmine • 2 pink grapefruit • 3 bergamot

Parfumerie the Natural Way

Making a “natural” perfume is easy: simply combine essential oils with a carrier oil in a glass container, shake, and you’re done, right?

Well, sort of. There are some challenges: figuring out which scents work together, how much of each to use, and how to give your perfectly-blended perfume staying power. The following are some perfume-making basics I’ve learned, sometimes the hard way, as I’ve blended, stirred, sniffed and blended again in the apothecary lab (okay, my kitchen):

Choose Your Oils
Use the scents you love, and stick with a small number – from a single note up to four, plus a fixative. Test combinations by dispensing a drop of each oil into your bottle, onto a cotton ball or makeup remover pad, or try out in a diffuser first.

Here’s a variety of essential oils suitable for making a fresh springtime or summer scent: (top, middle and base notes are indicated – see Get Blending, below)

Citrus: bergamot (t) • lemon (t) • lime (t) • mandarin (t) • sweet orange (t) • tangerine (t) • verbena (t)
Floral: geranium (m) • jasmine (m) • lavender (m) • neroli (m) • rose (m) • rosewood (m) • ylang ylang (m)*
Herbaceous: chamomile (m) • clary sage (m) • petitgrain (t-m) • rosemary (m)
Earthy/Woodsy: cedarwood (b) • cypress (m) • lemongrass (t-m) • patchouli (b) • sandalwood (b) • vetiver (b)
Refreshing: ginger (m-b) • grapefruit (t) • peppermint (t) • spearmint (t)

* I hate ylang ylang with a passion, so you’ll never see it in any of my formulations!

How Much?
If you don’t have a recipe, experiment, and be prepared for some failures* before you settle on the perfume you want. For a 5 mL bottle, I use a total of about 40 to 60 drops essential oils (taking up about ¼ of the bottle) diluted in a carrier oil. Start with a minimum number of drops per oil, keeping in mind that the mixture develops over hours and days, and strong-smelling oils tend to get stronger. Citrus oils are the most volatile, so use up to twice as much relative to your other ingredients. Don’t forget to record the amount of each oil used, including any adjustments, so that you have a final recipe that can be reproduced at the end of your labours – and the end of your bottle!

* Use up not-quite-perfect rejects in a diffuser, make into a foaming hand soap, add to bathwater, sprinkle on bedlinens, etc.

As you work, don’t forget to write down your formula!

Get Blending
Try to include top, middle and base notes so that you have a balanced formula that performs well and gives each scent element its fair due.

The “note” is the role each oil plays within a blend. Top notes (citrus, mints, delicate florals, soft herbals) provide an initial burst of fragrance which fades first, so you can usually use more of these compared to middle and bottom notes. Top notes give way to middle notes (more intense florals and herbs such as lavender, rose and jasmine); these are the heart of the fragrance. The anchoring bottom notes (rich, woodsy, earthy or resinous) support the others, add depth and are the longest-lasting components. Generally, the richer and stronger the smell of an oil, the more likely it is to be a middle or base note.

Set It So You Won’t Forget It
For a fragrance to last longer once applied, it’s important to include a fixative, an essential oil that is usually also a base note. Keep in mind that an essential oil perfume is never going to have the punch and staying power of a commercial perfume which contains a host of synthetic chemicals. Natural fragrances tend to be more subdued and wear close to the skin, which means you won’t give yourself a headache or knock over a room – a very good thing for you and everyone around you!

Some of the fixatives listed below, which are on the lighter side and suitable for spring and summer perfumes, can be harder to find in stores. You’ll probably have to buy them online, but they’re a worthwhile investment; I’ve found they make all the difference in the longevity of my blends. Since they’re less familiar than, say, lavender or peppermint, I’ve included their scent profiles for quick reference. How much to use? 5 to 8 drops of a fixative in your blend ought to be enough, especially if you’re using other base notes.

Benzoin (Styrax benzoin): (b) Warm, sweet, soft, vanilla-like, powdery • Possibly the most effective of the fixatives listed here, benzoin blends well with black pepper, copaiba balsam, coriander, cypress, frankincense, ginger, jasmine, juniper, lemon, myrrh, rose, sandalwood • Caution: Too much benzoin can lend a medicinal smell, so don’t go overboard. Also, it’s a sticky resin that may be difficult to dispense from the bottle.

Cistus (Cistus ladaniferus): (b) Sweet, woody, warm, resinous, with evergreen notes • Blends well with bergamot, chamomile, clary sage, cypress, frankincense, juniper, lavender, oakmoss, patchouli, pine, sandalwood, vetiver

Copaiba Balsam (Copaifera officinalis): (b) Mild, sweet, balsamic, vanilla-like • Blends well with cedarwood, citrus, clary sage, jasmine, rose, vanilla, ylang ylang

Frankincense, aka olibanum, boswellia (Boswellia carterii): (b) Woodsy, earthy, balsamic, spicy-sweet with slight lemony note • Blends well with bergamot, black pepper, cinnamon, cypress, geranium, grapefruit, lavender, lemon, mandarin, neroli, orange, palmarosa, patchouli, pine, rose, sandalwood, vetiver, ylang ylang

Myrrh (Commiphora myrrha): (b) Warm, earthy, balsamic, resinous, dry, sometimes bitter • Blends well with bergamot, chamomile, clove, cypress, lemon eucalyptus, frankincense, geranium, grapefruit, jasmine, juniper, lavender, lemon, neroli, palmarosa, patchouli, pine, rose, rosemary, sandalwood, tea tree, vetiver, ylang ylang

Peru Balsam, aka Balsam of Peru (Myroxylon pereira): (b) Soft, sweet, balsamic, mainly resinous with floral and vanilla undertones • Blends well with black pepper, ginger, jasmine, lavender, patchouli, petitgrain, rose, sandalwood, ylang ylang

Sandalwood (Santalum album or S. spicatum): (b) Mild, soft, woody, dry, sweet, somewhat balsamic • Blends well with benzoin, black pepper, chamomile, cistus, clary sage, clove, geranium, grapefruit, frankincense, jasmine, lavender, lemon, mandarin, myrrh, neroli, oakmoss, orange, palmarosa, patchouli, rose, rosewood, vetiver, ylang ylang

Happy blending!

Smells Like Spring

Over the next few weeks – the season of April showers and May flowers – I’ll be sharing my adventures in making natural perfumes and other springtime-scented goodies for the home and body. My theme for this month, then, is Making Scents of Spring. First up: DIY essential oil roll-on perfumes.

The novel The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George was a light and airy balm to my winter-weary spirits. The France of books and screen always gives me a much-needed boost, whether it be the Provençal countryside with its warm azure skies, lavender fields and cedars, or the cafés, boulangeries and rain-washed pavements of the City of Light. Charmant! After reading Bookshop, I was inspired to get out my box of essential oils to create three new seasonal fragrances, each of them incorporating some form of citrus to brighten and invigorate. Look for my recipes at the end of this post.

But before we go on, I’d like to offer an alternate title for this article: Natural DIY Perfumes – Debunking the Online Myth. Most recipes tell you to add a scant few drops of your favourite essential oils to a lot of carrier oil (usually 10 mL), et voilà! You have your own bespoke perfume. Well, oui et non. Yes, the result will be a lovely blend that smells great in the bottle, but it’ll likely be a transitory whiff that simply won’t offer staying power on the skin. After plenty of research, trial and error, what I’ve found is that a perfume that is actually noticeable and long-lasting requires a fair amount of essential oil and a fixative to help those volatile oils from evaporating dans un instant.

My next post will list a variety of essential oils perfect for creating your own light and refreshing personal blend, as well as information on fixatives – the most effective of which are less well known and harder to find. But first…

What You Need to Make Your Own Natural Perfume:

  • a few favourite essential oils, including one fixative
  • a stable carrier oil such as fractionated coconut (my favourite), apricot kernel or jojoba
  • glass bottle – I like to use 5 mL vials with rollerball tops for ease of application
  • small funnel and reusable glass eyedroppers (pipettes) for no-mess dispensing (optional)

How To:

Add essential oils drop by drop to the empty perfume bottle, sniffing as you work • Top up with carrier oil, making sure to leave enough room for the rollerball, which you will insert once you’re satisfied with the blend • Cover the bottle top tightly with plastic wrap and an elastic band, shake thoroughly, and let sit for at least 24 hours to allow the blend to develop • Shake and test periodically, adding more essential oil if necessary (I wear mine after each addition to see how it performs) • Push in the rollerball insert securely and close with the cap • Shake well before each use, and apply sparingly to pulse points.

Here are the scents I came up with for my (imaginary) trip to springtime France. The numbers are the drops needed for each essential oil. Top, middle, base and fixative notes are also indicated.

Fleurs de Provence essential oil perfume (5 mL)

A lemon-drop sun and fields of fragrant mauve stretching to a horizon of saturated blue. Sweet citrus and warm cedar round out the sharp hit of lavender in this decidedly feminine scent. The resinous evergreen notes of cistus (Cistus ladaniferus) work particularly well with the perfume’s other bright elements.

35 lemon (t) • 5 lavender (m) • 5 cedarwood (b) • 5 cistus (f) • fractionated coconut oil or carrier oil of your choice

Rain on the Pavement essential oil perfume (5 mL)

If you enjoy sipping café au lait and nibbling orange brioche whilst admiring the reflected lights of la tour Eiffel in the rainwashed street, this crisp and slightly spicy fragrance is for you. Bonus: it’s unisex! 

20 bergamot FCF* (t) • 2 clove (m) • 10 sandalwood (b) • 5 cistus (f) • fractionated coconut oil or carrier oil of your choice

* furocoumarin-free, which means the phytochemicals which cause skin to become photosensitive have been removed; sometimes labelled bergapten-free

Springtime in Paris essential oil perfume (5 mL)

This perfume is my favourite of the three: fresh and floral, with a subtle je ne sais quoi lent by the sandalwood. I use 5% rose and 20% frankincense in jojoba oil as affordable alternatives to the pure oils.

20 sweet orange (t) • 20 rose (m) • 15 sandalwood (b) • 5 frankincense (f) • fractionated coconut oil or carrier oil of your choice

Notes & Cautions:

• Never ingest essential oils • Do not apply undiluted to the skin • Do a patch test first • Avoid using if pregnant • Some essential oils, especially citrus, can cause skin to become photo-sensitive, so keep perfumed skin out of the sun • Test to make sure the bottle doesn’t leak before carrying in your handbag • Keep perfume and essential oils away from heat and direct sunlight.

Literary Apothecary

The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George (Penguin Random House, 2015)

My mother found this gem in her condominium’s lending library and gave it to me with glowing reviews. As I began to read it (the fourth of my 16+ goal for this year), I was immediately drawn in to this charming and sometimes heartrending world of lost love, regret and redemption, set in the streets of Paris and the canals, rivers and vineyards of southern France.

The Little Paris Bookshop was originally published in German as Das Lavendelzimmer (The Lavender Room) in 2013. The English-language version is pretty good; there are only a few passages that hint of this being a translation, and even they lend a quaintly amusing air to the book.

The title is a bit of a misnomer. Only the first few chapters take place in Paris, and the bookstore in question is of a rather peculiar nature: it’s a renovated barge operated by Monsieur Perdu, a self-styled “literary apothecary”. Like the bonbon-dispensing confiseuse in Joanne Harris’ Chocolat, Perdu prescribes just the right book to his customers, each of whom is searching for more than a good read. The lonely and broken-hearted, the damaged and bewildered – even the stereotypical silly tourist – all board the floating bookshop in search of Perdu’s particular brand of pistou for the soul.

When it comes to helping his patients, the apothicaire may be skilled, but he is unable to find a cure for his own despair. Just as the book barge is permanently moored to the banks of the Seine, the middle-aged Perdu has lived-but-not-lived for twenty years, transfixed by grief, regret, missed opportunity and the fear of death. Will he, with the aid of several eccentric companions, be able to cast off the tethers which bind him to the past and navigate the winding and sometimes treacherous route to wholeness and a peace-filled mind, body and soul?

Literary references, gustatory delights and lyrical landscapes abound in this novel which is equal parts travelogue, culinary journey and paean to books and food, friendship, France and love. It is by no means perfectly written; there are some tiresome clichés, and I can’t stomach the fact that all the characters spend every moment of their lives in deep, hand-wringing angst. However, I’m a sucker for evocative novels set in sun-drenched, lavender-scented France and Italy (think: Peter Mayle’s A Year in Provence, Under the Tuscan Sun by Frances Mayes and Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert), and George’s take on the countryside, traditional food and wine, plus the quirky French-ness of the protagonist and his friends, came at just the right time. As the stubborn vestiges of winter still cling, The Little Paris Bookshop is a welcome breath of fresh air.

Up next: Do-it-yourself springtime scents, inspired by The Little Paris Bookshop!

Detail, 12″ x 12″ Recollections scrapbook paper in “Paris Florals” from Michaels

Bring On Spring!

I mentioned in an earlier post, New Beginnings, that the practice of looking for signs of seasonal change in nature is called phenology. The lightening of days, less bite to the breeze, shy heads of crocus peeking through last year’s leaves. With that first robin’s song or even a softer, gentler rain, suddenly our hearts are lifted and there is, yes, a spring in our step!

Today marks the Vernal Equinox, the first day of Spring. Here’s a look at just a few of our earliest-emerging species, typically seen in eastern Canada mid to late March, early April and May. To me, they are the surest signs that Monsieur l’Hiver has left us for another nine months or so, and that sweet Mademoiselle Printemps is here to stay!

Click on each image for expansion/slideshow and details.

St. Maewyn’s Day

You may know this fellow better by his adopted name: Patrick.

Patrick was named Maewyn Succat when he was born circa 385 CE to a wealthy Roman family in either Wales or Scotland. At age 16, he was kidnapped by raiders and sold as a slave to Ireland, living there for six years as a shepherd and learning about its people until he managed to escape back to England. It was when he became a priest that he changed his name to Patricius. Patrick returned to Ireland as a missionary, preaching and converting the pagans to Christianity. In the Catholic church, his feast day is the day of his death, traditionally believed to be on March 17, 416 CE.

Legend has it that Patrick used the three-leaved shamrock (Irish seamróg = “little or young clover”) as a metaphor for the Holy Trinity. He may also have chosen this plant because the number 3 was significant for Celtic pagans; it is the “number of everything”. It wasn’t until the 18th century, though, that the shamrock began to be used as an Irish symbol. The shamrock (several species of Trifolium) has traditional medicinal value and was a common Victorian motif. In the Language of Flowers, the red clover signifies the virtue of industry, white clover means “think of me”, and the four-leaved variety says “be mine”.

Wearing green today? When the chivalric Order of St. Patrick was founded in the 1700s, blue was adopted as its official colour, which led to that colour – not green, which was considered unlucky – being associated with the saint. The use of green to represent Irish nationalism stems from 17th and 18th century political movements.

It’s understandable that legend, cultures and customs meld over time. It’s still an odd thing to me, however, that folk worldwide suddenly become Irish for a day on March 17 – and celebrate it in some pretty outrageous ways. I don’t march in parades or look for leprechauns, but I have been known to wear green on the day – although I wear it often, as it, along with blue, is one of my favourite colours. I don’t drink beer, so the green Guinness is out. (But that would be an insult to Guinness aficionados, anyway!)

I do think of my paternal grandmother, though. I know very little about her; my father never said much, for the very reason that he wasn’t given the chance to know her, either, and now there is no one left to ask. What I did discover through genealogical research, however, was that she emigrated as a young woman from Belfast to Canada in the early 1900s. Why? To seek a new life: employment, better housing, a marriage? I don’t know whether she had known my English-born grandfather, who was already living in Toronto, before she set foot on that ocean-crossing steamer. Regardless, they married soon after she arrived – and soon after that, came my dad! Sadly, that little family’s hopes and dreams died along with her a couple of years later in childbed, after my father’s little sister was born. A heart-wrenching story of hardship, struggle and lost dreams – but then, historically speaking – doesn’t that make me so quintessentially Irish?

Detail, Book of Kells scarf – a treasured gift from a friend.